Robert Pimm

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Happiness and small victories

When was the last time you punched the air and said “yesssssssssss!”?

If you want to understand me a bit, read on.

Air-punching is the stuff of small victories.  You disagree?  Please leave a comment below.  I would argue that with big victories (child born; illness overcome) you feel a powerful inner glow and no air-punching goes on.  But I digress.  My recent small victory involved the mileometer (an English word, the spell-check tells me – more usually odometer in the US and probably more appropriate here also as I actually choose to measure my cycling progress in small, rapidly-mounting kilometres rather than large, hard-to-accumulate miles, a fascinating subject in itself) on my bicycle.

I bought this bike on 16 July 1998 in Bonn, along with three other bicycles which have since perished.  One was out-grown.  Two were destroyed when a car I was in skidded on snowy tires in my garage in Kyiv and crushed the bikes, which were leaning against the wall and thus in the wrong place at the wrong time.  My own bike was leaning against a different wall and escaped.

The bike on the Rhine tow-path – before I uglified it with yellow tape for Berlin – Photo Robert Pimm

In Bonn, I cycled 14 km each day to and from work, mostly on a tow-path along the Rhine, (more…)

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Klimt, Beethoven, The Grateful Dead and Bruce – how they fit together

I wrote a while ago about “7 ways to explain the meaning of life“.

I said that the meaning of life would emerge around 80% of the way through my novel Biotime; and that it involved “Come Celebrate with Us” and “The Kiss”.

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Wiener Secession, 2015 – Photo: Robert Pimm

I recently visited Vienna and was delighted to find that the wonderful Secession building built in 1897 by Joseph Maria Olbrich had got a new basement (confession: it actually opened in 1986 when I was living in Vienna, but I never got around to visiting it).  Better still, that basement houses Gustav Klimt’s magnificent Beethoven frieze, (more…)

When waiting for a Red London bus is pure pleasure

I wrote last week how we all have a limited number of years, months, weeks and days to live.

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My blog Read this now – before you waste more of your precious life pointed out that most of us feel short of time; and are not sure how to spend what time we have.

So what would happen in a world where some people were able to live for hundreds of years.  What leisure activities would they seek?  Read on:

Edited excerpt from “Biotime” Chapter 15

KY Sutanto had visited London many times. But this was his first venture to the district called “South of the River”. (more…)

Red London buses and the meaning of life

We all have a limited number of years, months, weeks and days to live.

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So why should we spend that time waiting for a red London bus?

My recent blog Read this now – before you waste more of your precious life pointed out that most of us feel short of time; and are not sure how to spend what time we have.  I also noted that my novel Biotime (hit link to read) explored 5 ways wealth and creativity can’t mix (links in bold italics are to other posts on this site).

The conclusions of Biotime are good news for poor people.

So where do London buses come in? (more…)

Read this now – before you waste more of your precious life

Have you ever wondered: “what shall I do today?”

Or even: “what shall I do now?”

It’s one of life’s mysteries that:

– we all have a limited number of years, months, weeks and days to live;

– we all want to make the most of that time;

– many of us feel short of time to do the things we want;

– and yet… when we do have some free time, we’re not sure what to do with it.

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It depends how you look at it.  Anish Kapoor in Istanbul.  Photo: Robert Pimm

Part of the problem is excess choice.  Twenty years ago, I had a job where I flew regularly between London and the Far East in business class.  I had a busy job, and I used to relish the thought of a 15-hour flight with no disturbances and a host of pleasures on-tap.  But when I settled down into my comfy seat on the plane, I sometimes found myself overwhelmed by a kind of existential panic.  Should I (more…)

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