Robert Pimm

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Two great sources of writing inspiration

You are a brilliant writer.

But not everyone realises it yet.

What to do?

One of the great truths of writing is that however brilliant you may be, getting someone to read and appreciate your work requires contact with other human beings.  I don’t mean publishers and agents, important as they are; but writers; editors; critics; and other, often annoying, people who give you advice on how to improve, polish and market your fiction.

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George Orwell: another inspirational author (see below)

Here are two sources of such contacts.

First, I recently had the good fortune to hear the writer Paul McVeigh reading from his debut novel The Good Son in Izmir (the link goes to a goodreads site with rave reviews).  He was inspiring and entertaining, and mentioned his blog, which gets a staggering 40,000+ hits a month.   (more…)

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2 sets of brilliant tips on “how to write”

I wrote a blog a while back called “how to write“.  It was one of my most popular blogs.

Here are two lists of tips from famous authors about “how to write”.

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The first list, by George Orwell, is good for style:

  1. Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print.
  2. Never use a long word where a short one will do.
  3. If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out.
  4. Never use the passive where you can use the active.
  5. Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent.
  6. Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous.

The excellent writer Owen Matthews brought to my attention a second list, by Henry Miller. It is good for (more…)

My fifth fabulous Hotel Story – “Ask for Scarlett” – now available!

I’m delighted to announce that the fifth in the series of “Hotel Stories”, Ask for Scarlett, is now available.  If you have a Kindle, or a Kindle app on your iPad, laptop or other digital device, you can download it instantly with six other stories in Hotel Stories: the Complete Collection.

 

 

I wrote about Ask for Scarlett in a previous post, including the fact that it lets us, for the first time, see parts of the story from the point of view of Ms N – the most brilliant, unpredictable and occasionally homicidal hotel manager in the world.  It may also, perhaps, introduce a couple of comparatively sympathetic male characters.

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Biotime: latest news & 2 more juicy quotes

Millions of readers and tens of millions of writers wonder constantly: what’s it like publishing a novel on-line?  Does anyone read it?  And are free novels on-line worth reading anyhow?

I’ve started answering those questions with my novel  Biotime.

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Mortality and immortality are central themes of Biotime.  Photo: Robert Pimm

 

Part of the answer is that, like everything else creative, publishing a novel on-line takes patience and tenacity.  Since I began this exercise in early December I have rarely had thousands of readers flocking to the site – unlike when I previewed another novel of mine with “sex” in the title, and found lots of people instantly wanted to know about it.

(more…)

Biotime 9: ‘This was not life-swapping. It was robbery’

Here is the ninth droplet of Biotime.

Feedback welcome: on content, frequency, style or anything else.  I’d love to hear from you.

I’m also publishing a “story so far” post for infrequent readers, bringing together the excerpts published up to now.

Ghanaian market 3, Nov 04

Ghanaian market – Photo SDT

 

Biotime.  The future, today.  Excerpt 9

[Part 1, Breughel vs. Jones, continues]

Lumusi stood up straight and was blinded by a blaze of camera flashes. Her words rang harsh in her ears.

‘I need your Biotime or I and my wife will die,’ the old man said. ‘Is it true they paid you only three hundred thousand dollars?’

‘Yes.’

He shook his head. ‘But how old are you? Surely you have more than ten years left to live?’

(more…)

Biotime 8: the scandalous and exciting Lumusi Jones

Here is the eighth excerpt from Biotime.

I plan to release Biotime in droplets – short excerpts, fairly often.  Feedback welcome: on content, frequency, style or anything else.  I’d love to hear from you.

I’m also publishing a “story so far” post for infrequent readers, bringing together the excerpts published up to now.

Ghanaian market 3, Nov 04

Ghanaian market – Photo SDT

 

Biotime.  The future, today.  Excerpt 8

[Part 1, Breughel vs. Jones, continues]

Lumusi Jones stood facing the altar. She wore a white blouse and a long red skirt, with a simple black bag over her shoulder. Breughel took a few steps down the aisle, still supported by the burly nun. A sigh went up from the congregation.

Lumusi Jones turned.

Breughel saw that her face was wet with tears. Her fists were clenched. Yet he could only think how beautiful she was. And how young.

 *

At first, Lumusi Jones did not see the old man. Ever since she had arrived here, crowds had been gathering. At first, Mother Hope had placed her with three other “children” the Church had persuaded to renege on their Termination Contracts. But since this so-called Dying Dutchman, Breughel, had announced he was flying to Ghana, it seemed every man, woman and child in Accra wanted to see the scandalous and exciting Lumusi Jones.

(more…)

Biotime 7: The Dying Dutchman

Here is the seventh droplet of my novel Biotime.

Feedback welcome: on content, frequency, style or anything else.  I’d love to hear from you.

I’m also publishing a “story so far” post for infrequent readers, bringing together the excerpts published up to now.

Ghanaian market 3, Nov 04

Ghanaian market – Photo SDT

 

Biotime.  The future, today.  Excerpt 7

[Part 1, Breughel vs. Jones, continues]

Two hours later, Breughel was beginning to understand that his humiliation had barely begun. In the sweltering minibus on the way to the Church, Wilhelm explained what he called the paradigm of his channel’s coverage.

‘We are casting you as the victim. So it is good if you are arriving at the church looking weak and exhausted. It is also good if your suit makes you sweat, or if your disease is making you tremble. If you were looking like a rich Dutch businessman coming to enforce a contract against a poor Ghanaian girl, our viewers would hate you. Actually, everyone would hate you.’

‘I have nothing. But people hate me anyway,’ Breughel said.

‘That is why we are calling you the Dying Dutchman. When we reach the church, people must see you suffer.’ (more…)

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